Ewings Sarcoma

Ewing’s sarcoma, a childhood cancer, is fairly rare, but is often curable. Information on Ewings sacroma is key! The most important factor is making an early diagnosis. The second critical piece of information on Ewings sarcoma is the choice and monitoring of proper pediatric cancer treatment.

Ewing’s sarcoma mostly strikes between the ages of 10 and 20, but younger children and older adults can also get the disease. The cause of Ewing’s sarcoma is unknown. Like other cancers it is not infectious and cannot be passed on to other people. However, like other sarcomas; it can be spread to other parts of the body. Symptoms of Ewing’s sarcoma vary depending on the location and size of the cancer. The most common symptoms are pain and swelling or tenderness in the affected area. Pain may become very intense when the tumor is located near important nerves, like in the pelvis or spine. Swelling is often seen, especially when the long bones of the arms or legs are affected.

Sometimes the Ewing’s sarcoma tumor can interfere with movement and can weaken bones, occasionally leading to a fracture. Other Ewing’s sarcoma symptoms may include tiredness, fever, weight loss, and anemia.

Ewing’s sarcoma may be diagnosed from ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) scan, positron emission tomography (PET) scan, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or even an x-ray. Probably the most essential diagnostic tool at present is an MRI. A specialist must biopsy a mass when Ewing’s sarcoma is suspected. A bone marrow biopsy may also be needed to evaluate the extent of Ewing’s sarcoma.

Information on curing Ewings sarcoma: Most children with Ewing’s sarcoma can be cured. Even if the tumor returns, further treatment may be given successfully. Surgery and radiotherapy can stop bones from growing and may make muscles and tendons shorter. Thusly, further operations later in life are necessary. However, most children who are successfully treated for Ewing’s sarcoma grow up with little disability if a timely diagnosis is made and proper Ewing’s sarcoma treatment begins.

Information on Failure to diagnose Ewing’s sarcoma properly may be due to: Today’s average medical practitioner will rarely see a child with cancer. Lack of familiarity with the signs and symptoms of childhood cancer may be one reason why the diagnosis is delayed or missed. Another reason may be the result of too many layers of healthcare bureaucracy or the exorbitant cost of healthcare.

Failure to diagnose Ewing’s sarcoma and other childhood cancers may result in medical malpractice.

Information on Litigating Ewings Sarcoma cases: Do Ewing’s sarcoma medical malpractice cases end up in trial?
Many Ewing’s sarcoma and other pediatric cancer cases are resolved without going to trial; however, an insurance company cannot settle a case without consent of its insured. Also some medical malpractice cases never go to trial but instead are resolved through binding arbitration. Many hospitals, doctors, and HMOs ask patients to sign an agreement to go to binding arbitration in the event of a claim or dispute. These agreements are often in fine print in the initial papers a patient fills out when first seeing a doctor or upon admission to a hospital or joining a HMO.

Childhood cancer is still considered a rare a childhood disease.

Advances in survival of childhood cancer over the past three decades have been promising. Today approximately 75 percent of childhood cancers are potentially curable. This is achievable by the combination of three important therapeutic modalities: chemotherapy, surgery, and radiotherapy – and by aggressive clinical trials comparing the best known therapy with new treatment innovations. These trials have been conducted by multidisciplinary teams working together. The combined and shared expertise greatly improves the chance and quality of survival.

But the bottom line that all experts agree upon is that timely and proper diagnosis of Ewing’s sarcoma is crucial to the success of the childhood cancer treatment by further increasing an optimal outcome.

The chance of Edwin’s sarcoma recovery and choice of treatment depends on the location, size, and stage of the cancer or how far the childhood cancer has spread, how the sarcoma cancer cells react to the treatment, and the child’s age and general health.

Except for hematological (blood-related) cancers and brain tumors, the principal childhood cancers are seldom seen in adults. In children, deep-seated sarcomas and embryonic tumors are the rule. Many of the well-known classic warning signs of adult cancer apply to carcinomas that are extremely rare in children. Pediatric tumors do not involve epithelial tissues so they do not bleed externally or exfoliate cells. Screening techniques useful in adults, such as stool blood tests or Pap smears, have no counterparts in children.

Childhood cancer theories: How do children differ from adults in getting cancer?

Children grow very rapidly; therefore they are continually producing new cells, leading to growth, and also heal faster of any damage.

Children have stronger immune systems; a child is usually stronger and healthier in all respects, including immunity.

Children have fewer years on the planet so they have less exposure to toxins, bacteria, and viruses.

Children have less raging hormones; pre-puberty children do not have active sex hormones fluctuating throughout the body.

All of this circumstantial childhood cancer evidence can be interpreted various ways. Perhaps the childhood cancers are more pure, arising naturally from internal DNA errors, without any environmental triggers. Children have not been subject to years of environmental radiation and toxins. Children don’t have hormonal fluctuations, which are more direct triggers than rare DNA duplication errors. Hence, their skin and other surface cells do not have enough damage to cause cancers.

Perhaps children’s DNA repair mechanisms are better except for these particular cell types. An alternative medicine theory might propose that children are less stressed and happier, and only get cancers that are non-stress-related.

Warning signs, symptoms and treatments of pediatric cancer and Ewing’s sarcoma

Ewing’s sarcoma, a type of pediatric cancer, spreads when tumor cells enter the blood supply and are circulated to other parts of the body where they may form secondary tumors (metastases). Chemotherapy is given to kill circulating tumor cells. Secondary tumors are most commonly found in the lungs and other bones. Tumor cells may also spread via the lymphatic system. Also, tumors can spread by direct growth of the primary tumor.

What are the symptoms of Ewing’s sarcoma? Symptoms of Ewing’s sarcoma vary from patient to patient and depend on the location and size of the cancer.
The most common symptoms are:

  • Pain and swelling or tenderness in the affected area. Pain may become very intense when the tumor is located near important nerves.
  • Swelling is prevalent, especially when the long bones of the arms or legs are affected.
  • Fractures may be caused by weakening of the bones related to tumors.
  • Other symptoms of cancer may include tiredness, fever, weight loss, and anemia.

However, none of these symptoms is a sure sign of cancer which is why early detection and prognosis is so important as well as a knowledgeable doctor who is willing to take the proper tests at his disposal.

What are the treatments for Ewing’s sarcoma? Pediatric cancer patients with Ewing’s sarcoma receive a combination of cancer-fighting drugs (chemotherapy) as well as surgery or radiation. Even when the tumor is detected at a very small size, there may be evidence of microscopic spread. For this reason, Ewing’s sarcoma requires treatment to the entire body. This treatment includes chemotherapy which should destroy pediatric cancer cells which have spread to the rest of the body, and to shrink the main mass of tumor cells.

In about 80 percent of Ewing’s sarcoma cases involving an arm or leg, the limb can be saved, if there was no failure to diagnose this pediatric cancer disease. Significant limb-saving techniques include bone grafts, rotation-plasty, and prosthetic implants. Pediatric cancer patients may also participate in clinical trials. Clinical trials for children and adolescents with pediatric cancer are generally designed to compare potentially better therapy with therapy that is currently accepted as standard. Most of the progress made in identifying curative therapies for childhood cancers has been achieved through clinical trials.

The Ewing’s sarcoma family of tumors include: Ewing’s tumor of bone; extraosseus (tumor growing outside of the bone); primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), also known as peripheral neuroepithelioma; and Askin’s tumor (PNET of the chest wall). These tumors are rare diseases in which malignant cancer cells are found in the bone and soft tissues. Ewing’s family of tumors most frequently occur in teenagers.

The most common types of pediatric cancer are leukemia, lymphoma, and tumors in the brain or abdomen. Suspect pediatric cancer in a child with any of the following symptoms:

  • unexplained bruises
  • persistent oozing from mouth or nose
  • bone pain that is not localized to a specific area and wakes the child at night
  • limping or unable to bear weight
  • backache
  • swollen lymph glands that do not reduce in size – biopsy recommended
  • headaches lasting longer than 2 weeks
  • early morning vomiting

Has your child or grandchild been diagnosed improperly for Ewing’s sarcoma? How can you fight back? Click here for a FREE, no-obligation consultation with a pediatric cancer failure diagnosis lawyer.

Pediatric Cancer Warning Signs

Warning signs and symptoms of pediatric cancer and Ewing’s sarcoma

Ewing’s sarcoma, a type of pediatric cancer, spreads when tumor cells enter the blood supply and are circulated to other parts of the body where they may form secondary tumors (metastases). Chemotherapy is given to kill circulating tumor cells. Secondary tumors are most commonly found in the lungs and other bones. Tumor cells may also spread via the lymphatic system. Also, tumors can spread by direct growth of the primary tumor.

What are the symptoms of Ewing’s sarcoma? Symptoms of Ewing’s sarcoma vary from patient to patient and depend on the location and size of the cancer.
The most common symptoms are:

  • Pain and swelling or tenderness in the affected area. Pain may become very intense when the tumor is located near important nerves.
  • Swelling is prevalent, especially when the long bones of the arms or legs are affected.
  • Fractures may be caused by weakening of the bones related to tumors.
  • Other symptoms of cancer may include tiredness, fever, weight loss, and anemia.

However, none of these symptoms is a sure sign of cancer which is why early detection and prognosis is so important as well as a knowledgeable doctor who is willing to take the proper tests at his disposal.

The Ewing’s sarcoma family of tumors include: Ewing’s tumor of bone; extraosseus (tumor growing outside of the bone); primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), also known as peripheral neuroepithelioma; and Askin’s tumor (PNET of the chest wall). These tumors are rare diseases in which malignant cancer cells are found in the bone and soft tissues. Ewing’s family of tumors most frequently occur in teenagers.

The most common types of pediatric cancer are leukemia, lymphoma, and tumors in the brain or abdomen. Suspect pediatric cancer in a child with any of the following symptoms:

  • unexplained bruises
  • persistent oozing from mouth or nose
  • bone pain that is not localized to a specific area and wakes the child at night
  • limping or unable to bear weight
  • backache
  • swollen lymph glands that do not reduce in size – biopsy recommended
  • headaches lasting longer than 2 weeks
  • early morning vomiting

Ewing’s sarcoma and treatments for childhood cancer

What are the treatments for Ewing’s sarcoma? Childhood cancer patients with Ewing’s sarcoma receive treatment through a combination of cancer-fighting drugs (chemotherapy) as well as surgery or radiation. Even when the tumor is detected at a very small size, there may be evidence of microscopic spread. For this reason, childhood cancer and Ewing’s sarcoma require treatment to the entire body. This treatment includes chemotherapy which should destroy pediatric cancer cells which have spread to the rest of the body, and to shrink the main mass of tumor cells.

It is important for childhood cancer and Ewing’s sarcoma patients to be evaluated for treatment by a radiologist, hemo-therapist, pathologist, surgeon, or orthopedic oncologist, and radiation oncologist as soon as possible. The surgeon or orthopedic oncologist performing the surgery should be involved during the biopsy so that the incision can be placed in an acceptable location. This is especially important if the lesion can be totally excised or if a limb salvage procedure will be attempted. The radiation oncologist and pathologist should be consulted prior to biopsy/surgery in order to verify that the incision will not compromise the radiation port and so that multiple types of tissue samples are obtained. Diagnostic scans (chest x-ray, chest computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], or CT of the primary) should be performed prior to any procedure that requires anesthesia because anesthesia-induced abnormalities in the chest may be difficult to assess. Other studies such as a bone scan and bone marrow biopsy may be obtained preoperatively too.

In about 80 percent of Ewing’s sarcoma cases involving an arm or leg, the limb can be saved, if there was no failure to diagnose this childhood cancer disease.

Significant limb-saving techniques include bone grafts, rotation-plasty, and prosthetic implants. Childhood cancer patients may also participate in clinical trials. Clinical trials for children and adolescents with cancer are generally designed to compare potentially better therapy with therapy that is currently accepted as standard. Most of the progress made in identifying curative therapies for childhood cancers has been achieved through clinical trials.

More facts about childhood cancer care and Ewing’s sarcoma treatment: After a timely and proper diagnosis, the second critical component to being cured is getting Ewing’s sarcoma treatments that do not greatly impact the quality of life. Chemo drugs for childhood cancer patients cause the usual outwardly visible side effects such as hair loss and nausea. More serious side effects are listed on the drug information sheet of each chemotherapy drug. Parents are urged to read these thoroughly and focus on the immediate threads and potentially dangerous side effects that are a direct result of the pediatric cancer treatments.

Appropriate chemotherapy will rapidly wipe out growing bone marrow cells as well as the Ewing’s sarcoma cancerous cells. Therefore, red blood cells, good white blood cells, and platelets are not formed. Without red blood cells, children get tired and weak. A transfusion of red blood cells is a solution. Without platelets, children will be unable to stop bleeding, if cut. A platelet transfusion is another transfusion.

White blood cells are monitored throughout the treatment. Without the right kind of white blood cells, patients are unable to fight off an infection. The amount of white blood cells are measured. If the white bloods range between 500-1000, the child teeters in the danger zone. If the white blood cells are under 500, the child must avoid crowded places.

Infections develop rapidly in pediatric cancer patients. If a child has a fever of 101, the clinic must immediately be notified. Most hospitals have an oncologist on call 24 hours a day to help the parents.

Infections can be fungal, bacterial, or viral. Fungal infections can be particularly nasty for pediatric cancer patients. Sometimes infections are caused by the medi-port lines; sometimes there is a fever; and sometimes doctors cannot find the cause of an infection.

What are the signs of different types of Childhood Cancer?

Bone Cancers

  • pain in a bone

  • swelling or tenderness around a bone or joint

  • interference with normal movements

  • weak bones, leading to fractures

  • fatigue, fever, weight loss, anemia

Leukemia

  • lethargy, weakness, paleness, dizziness

  • back, leg, and joint pain, headache, trouble standing or walking

  • easy bruising, unusual bleeding, frequent nose bleeds, bleeding gums, petechiae (red pinpoints on the skin)

  • repeated, frequent infections

  • fever that lasts for several days

  • loss of appetite, weight loss

  • swollen lymph nodes, bloated or tender stomach, swollen liver or spleen

  • night sweats

  • irritability

Neuroblastoma

  • lump or mass in the abdomen, chest, neck, or pelvis

  • loss of appetite, nausea, weight loss, stomach pain, constipation, difficulty urinating

  • changes in the eyes: black eyes, a droopy eyelid, a pupil that doesn’t constrict, vision problems

  • pain in the chest, difficulty breathing, persistent cough

  • pain or numbness in the lower extremities, limping, inability to stand, stumbling

  • bone pain, fever, irritability, listlessness

  • backaches (backaches in children are not usual)

Wilms Tumor

  • abdominal swelling and/or pain

  • nausea

  • vomiting

  • constipation

  • loss of appetite

  • fever of unknown origin

  • night sweats

  • abnormal urine color or blood in the urine

  • malaise

Brain Cancers

  • a seizure not related to high fever

  • staring, repetitive automatic movements

  • persistent vomiting without any known cause (projectile vomiting), nausea

  • progressive weakness or clumsiness; neck tilt, squint

  • walking, balance problems

  • precocious puberty; growth retardation

  • sleep apnea

  • vision problems

  • headache, especially that wakes the child up at night or is early in the morning

  • pain, especially back pain, which should be taken seriously in a child

  • changes in personality, irritability, listlessness

  • excessive thirst and excessive urination (rare, if the tumor is pressing against the pituitary)

Rhabdomyosarcoma

  • lump or swelling, firm and painless to touch, in the extremities, the groin area, or the vaginal area

  • drooping eyelids, swelling of the eye, protruding eyeball, rapid vision changes

  • hoarseness, difficulty in swallowing

  • abdominal pain which persists for more than a week

Lymphomas

  • swollen lymph node, especially in the neck, armpit or groin

  • swelling of the face

  • weakness, tiredness

  • sweating, especially at night

  • unexplained fever

  • unexplained weight loss

  • abdominal pain or swelling

  • pain

  • breathing difficulties, occasional cough, sometimes difficulty in swallowing

Retinoblastoma

  • whitish color behind the pupil

  • problems with eye movements (crossed eyes)

  • a red irritation that persists


Online Childhood Cancer Resources

Here is a comprehensive list of online cancer resources. Please bookmark this page and come back often for reading and research.

National Cancer Institute http://cancer.gov
The NCI, established under the National Cancer Act of 1937, is the Federal Government’s principal agency for cancer research and training. The site is a resource for cancer statistics, clinical trials, research and funding, and a cancer-related glossary.

Pediatric Cancer Foundation http://www.pcfweb.org
The Foundation was started by the parents of pediatric cancer patients and utilizes the services of devoted volunteers to perform every aspect of fundraising for basic and clinical research as well as in the care and treatment of children with cancer.

Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation
http://www.pcrf-kids.com The Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation, a non-profit organization, was founded in 1982 to improve the care, quality of life, and survival rate of children with malignant diseases.

Children’s Cancer Web Directoryhttp://www.cancerindex.org/ccw/guide2.htm
Established in 1996, the independent non-profit web site, provides a directory of childhood cancer resources for parents, caregivers, health professionals, and others interested in childhood cancer.

Rare Cancer Alliance http://www.rare-cancer.org
A community of caring volunteers whose primary purpose is to disseminate information and provide support to all pediatric (childhood) and adult rare cancer patients.  Our support members are patients or survivors, not medical professionals.

Candlelighters Childhood Cancer Foundation®http://www.candlelighters.org
The (CCCF) National Office is a national non-profit membership organization whose mission is to educate, support, serve, and advocate for families of children with cancer, survivors of childhood cancer, and the professionals who care for them. The organization was founded in 1970 by concerned parents of children with cancer.