Are you living with a disability and struggling to make ends meet? You may be wondering:

  • Am I eligible for Supplemental Security Income?
  • How much does SSI pay?
  • How do I apply for SSI?
  • Will I need a lawyer?

We can help you receive the benefits you need in order to provide for yourself and your family.

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Our Social Security lawyers are proud to help the elderly and disabled receive benefits.

— Michael Monheit, Esq.

Adjusting to life with a disability can be extremely difficult. You may be forced to give up activities which previously brought you joy and find yourself unable to work. The financial aspects of disabled life are particularly stressful. It's important for our disabled citizens to receive the financial assistance they need through programs like Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Who Is Eligible To Receive SSI?older man walking with crutches

SSI benefits are available to anyone who is either over the age of 65, blind, or disabled and is ineligible for Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits because of a lack of work history.

Additionally, your income and resources must fall below a certain threshold in order to qualify. Unfortunately, even if you do not qualify for SSD, your claim will be denied if your income and/or resources are too high.

Your injuries must be severe enough to prevent you from finding substantial gainful employment. These benefits are meant for people who struggle to pay for the costs of basic needs such as food, housing, and clothing. If you're temporarily out of work due to a job-related injury, you'd be better off applying for Workers' Comp.

If you're struggling to survive and think you may qualify for these benefits, you should consider meeting with an experienced benefits lawyer who can evaluate your personal situation.

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How Much Do SSI Benefits Pay?

In Pennsylvania, payments for Supplemental Security Income vary based on marital status, whether or not you live alone, and whether or not you have countable income which could reduce your payment. As of 2017, single applicants receive $735 per month while married couples receive $1,103. However, countable income decreases these payment amounts.

What Is Countable Income?male amputee in wheelchair

The Social Security Administration will evaluate your income in order to determine if you qualify for benefits and how much your payments will be. The Administration disregards the first $20 of your monthly income and the first $65 of earned income if you're working. Next, they divide your total monthly income in half to arrive at your total countable income.

Your countable income will be subtracted from your monthly payment. For example, if you were single and earning $600 each month from light part-time work, the Administration would first disregard the first $85 to arrive at $515. Then, they would disregard half of this number - or $257.50. This amount would be deducted from your monthly payment of $735 - leaving you with a total payout of $477.50.

In order to qualify for SSI, your total countable resources must fall below $2,000 for individuals and below $3,000 for couples. If your resources exceed these amounts, you may be better off applying for Social Security disability benefits instead.

How Do I Apply?

To apply for Supplemental Security Income, you must file a claim with the Social Security Administration. You can do this online at the SSA website, by calling the SSA to schedule an in-person appointment, or by visiting your local Social Security office. Visit the Social Security Administration's website for more details.

This process can be confusing, and it's not uncommon for claims to be denied. Whether you're trying to get your first claim accepted or are looking to file an appeal after being denied, the experienced lawyers at Monheit Law can help. We'll make sure you get the compensation you're entitled to and help you explore other possible options you may qualify for, such as Social Security disability benefits.

We understand the financial stress you may be feeling, and that's why we'll only ask for payment as a contingency fee after we've successfully helped you receive your benefits.